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Columbia Public Schools

Failing grades increase as CPS students learn online

Correction: This story previously reported the incorrect grade levels and proficiency from reported data.

COLUMBIA, Mo. (KMIZ)

Online learning continues to show it’s challenges within Columbia Public Schools as data shows failing grades are significantly up this year as students learn online. 

The Board of Education met on Monday to discuss and vote on what the future of learning would be for cps students. 

While CPS leaders were presenting data, both the board and parents were all shocked to hear how low grades have been so far this year.

Data that was released shows 69% of all grades are C’s or better. 

While data that was presented on Monday also showed there have been more F’s at all grade levels in core classes like math, science, English and history than last year. 

"The data presented with our grades is devastating, said Kristy Reichard, a CPS Parent. “It's heartbreaking, it's appalling... And it really reiterates what all of the parents who are the ones with these kids are the kids by themselves, what we have been saying that online is not working."

Taking a look at core classes the district says the number of F grades in elementary schools is up 35% compared to last year, while middle school was up 6.5% and high school was up 53%. 

And that’s not the only increase, elective classes saw a 244% increase in the number of F’s overall given so far. 

Data showed there has been an increase of nearly 600% in failing grades in elective classes like art, physical education, choir and band in middle school students and 74% in high school students. 

Dave Wilson, CPS Director of Assessment, Intervention and Data says these numbers are concerning. 

He went on to say that more than 30% of middle school student's F's are in PE. He attributes that to them not being engaged. 

While Reichard believes this is why it’s important to get all students back in the classroom. 

"How long do we wait before we say, ‘okay, we can't do this any longer,” said Reichard. “These kids have one shot with their grades, one shot to learn and to grow."

Columbia / Coronavirus / Education / K-12 education / News / Top Stories
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Amber Tabeling

Amber joined the ABC 17 News team as a multimedia journalist in December 2019. She was a student-athlete at Parkland College and Missouri Valley College. She hails from a small town in Illinois.

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1 Comment

  1. Of course the economic and social destruction imposed to keep us from catching a virus that’s no more dangerous than ordinary influenza has nothing to do with it, right? You suspect that children’s lives can be totally disrupted, and it will have no effect on their grades? I propose it has little to do with the physical means of teaching/learning, whether on line or in person, and far more to do with the complete overhaul of their entire environment. Their parents aren’t acting the same, they can’t go and do things they did before, there’s less money in the household, they see fear in a great many adults around them, and so become fearful themselves. Just more evidence the cure is worse than the disease.

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